Making happy business happen and awesomeness

An Intelligent Organization

Stubled across this brillianze from being followed by Kansas City’s @dustinj on Twitter… following the trail to  Shake Gently (great reading) … reading about how tuff it can be to explain what you do in the ever eveloving digtial space at Made by Many (good stuff)… picking up awesomeness as a word that is used way to little… to a new service (to me at least) called Posterous, awesome… to the What Consumes Me blog (don’t miss this) and this brilliant venn diagram and article.

We’ve found things we want to do, and can be paid for, but we’re not the best game in town. Mediocrity is not a sustainable strategy. Being able to recognize your own weakness is a profound strength, and acting to improve what you do is key to any kind of long term growth and stability. Find the best talent and steal them. Learn how your competitors run their businesses, and copy what works.

What a journey! What awesomeness!
Seriously, isn’t it awesome what you can find through social technology, great content, brilliant people and the greater internet – it still just blows my mind.

100 days later Service is still king

spinn

Arguably there should not be 100 between posts, but sometimes life and job get in the way… Well it is a nice even number of days to start again on though…  Just read a brilliant post – Content is a Service Business (Andrew Savikas on toc) – where I believe Andrew explains the challenges of content in a digital freemium world perfectly. Some great thoughts around the music/publishing/aggregation industries in there as well as links to some inspiring people. And, while on the subject of free, if you haven’t picked up a copy of FREE from Chris Anderson, do. Some interesting reading/listening about the history and future of the free business model.

This is not new to digital content. Why would the price of admission to see a given year’s Razzie Award winner be equivalent to the price of admission to see the year’s Best Picture? Because the price of admission is not for the content. It’s for the privilege of seeing it early, and doing so on a big screen in a social environment — movie patrons pay for the service provided by the theater, not for the movies themselves (here’s a counterpoint on movie pricing). That’s the point that Reznor and Kelly are making: think long and hard about what your customers want, and provide the service of giving that to them.

The Slow Down

So true, so true…
from the marketing guru Godin –Soggy

New organizations and new projects are so crisp.

Things happen with alacrity. Decisions get made. Stuff gets done.

Then, over time, things get soggy. They slow down. Decisions aren’t so black and white any more.

Why?

Here are some things that happen:
1. Every initiative, post launch, still has a tail of activity associated with it. Launch enough things and over time, that tail gets bigger and bigger.

2. Most projects either succeed or fail. Successful projects raise the stakes, because the team doesn’t want to blow it. There are more people watching, more dollars at stake, things matter more. So things inevitably get more review, more analysis and slow down. Projects that fail sap the confidence of the group. They want to be extra sure that they’re right this time, so, ironically, they slow down and end up sabotaging the new work.

3. The paper isn’t blank any more. Which means that new decisions often mean overturning old decisions, which means you need to acknowledge that it didn’t used to be as good as it was.

4. And the biggest thing is that there is a status quo. Something to compare everything to.

I’m not sure you can eliminate any of these issues. But, you can realize that they’re there. And you can be really strict about priorities and deadlines… it’s so easy to let things slip, rather than confronting the fact that you’re stuck and probably afraid. Speak up, call it out… and ship!