Why is the answer

If you hire people just because they can do a job, they’ll work for your money. But if you hire people who believe what you believe, they’ll work for you with blood and sweat and tears

Simon Sinek talks at TEDx about success, the why, how the brain translate, the law of diffusion of innovation, those who lead, and selfish inspiration. Got nothing here, just have to agree to all… Are you a leader of innovation?

Let’s get over Social Media and go back to the internet

We had web 2.0, we now have Social Media. What happened to the internet / the web? Both of the mentioned are evolution of the internet, as a technology and as a communication channel. Think Hugh (Gapingvoid) make a good point “the main point of the internet is to remove “barriers to socializing. Everything else is secondary”.

Let’s go back to the internet and make it more social as intended.

Thanks Judith for the point.

A Nice Conversation

This morning I spent two hours on the subject of IR (Investor Relation) and how it is impacted by the social shift online  (a breakfast seminar by Intellecta Corporate och SpareBank 1 Gruppen). IR is a new angel for me so I decided to check out what some experts had to say.

Must say that it was quite interesting listening with a great finish act by SB1. One thing that is similar to most corps, not surprising but non the less, is how this strict, controlled and number driven area of communication react when the social aspect is entered in to the equation. We have a scenario where traditional set ways meet conversation in a not so set way. And we get the now traditional “shit, they are talking to and about us.. shit, shit… what to do now” scenario. This is where one of the speakers form Intellecta (Elias Betinakis) ended his presentation of “what is web 2.0/sm and a lot of Twitter” with an excellent point – for the first time ever companies can actually be personal in their response. This was further discussed by the enthusiastic “Direktør Informasjon og samfunnskontakt” at SB1 – Christian Brosstad – where he encouraged to use common sens, your gut feeling and most importantly be nice and tell the truth. (find the presentation here)

See, it seems that this social thing turns out not to be so bad after all, it is just a conversation with people that actually care about your brand. And if you look at is closely, it is actually a great opportunity! a great opportunity to tell your story, be personal hens building real loyalty for your brand.

All in all a good start to a Thursday morning. Now lets see if I can make our (read: the company I work for) IR preform as well.

100 days later Service is still king

spinn

Arguably there should not be 100 between posts, but sometimes life and job get in the way… Well it is a nice even number of days to start again on though…  Just read a brilliant post – Content is a Service Business (Andrew Savikas on toc) – where I believe Andrew explains the challenges of content in a digital freemium world perfectly. Some great thoughts around the music/publishing/aggregation industries in there as well as links to some inspiring people. And, while on the subject of free, if you haven’t picked up a copy of FREE from Chris Anderson, do. Some interesting reading/listening about the history and future of the free business model.

This is not new to digital content. Why would the price of admission to see a given year’s Razzie Award winner be equivalent to the price of admission to see the year’s Best Picture? Because the price of admission is not for the content. It’s for the privilege of seeing it early, and doing so on a big screen in a social environment — movie patrons pay for the service provided by the theater, not for the movies themselves (here’s a counterpoint on movie pricing). That’s the point that Reznor and Kelly are making: think long and hard about what your customers want, and provide the service of giving that to them.

That extra effort

Seth and his brilliant illustrative blogging got me thinking about the one thing that all brands should do but usually market them self out of doing. It applies to even the most mediocre and “one in a million” boring  brand.

Give your “customer” something to talk about – a.k.a give them more that they expect.

Promise you that this is cheaper then that Super Bowl ad (OK, a little over pretentious example maybe), product space at that “in” store, or that exclusive address. + in the long run will build better brand.

Let me illustrate – you just bought designed paper clips (you know the curly kind in mat black) in an typically standard online store. It arrives 3 days later, stuffed in a brown box with the receipt. Fairly typical, right? What if instead you bought the same paper clips (mat black an all) in a beautifully designed online store (easy to use, easy to look at) that gave you some interesting examples on use and pointed you to  relevant info around the product. It arrives in 1 day (you paid for 3 day deliver) in a brown box with company logo nicely applied. You open it an see a neatly packed box (tissue paper and a branded sticker maybe) and a personal letter thanking you for your purchase (this was not your first purchase, they remember), asking how they can make the experience even better and offers rebates on relevant to you list of products.

Which shop and paper clip brand would you recommend to your friends?
Even if the there was two different brands would not both win? Even if you do not go all the way, just talking a step and give something more, unexpected will be worth the effort.

Do Something Worth Talking About

Just found these wise words on Paul Isakson’s blog:

Quit trying to “join the conversation.”

Stop trying to be everyone’s friend.

Don’t shove your marketing messages at people.

Just listen to what people are saying about your product or service and apply what you learn to making it better.

The same goes for your marketing.

Make it worth talking about.

Dito, that is all I can say.

Or just drink this 😉